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Grizzlies get Josh Jackson from Suns

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19 hours ago, memphis slim said:

true, but we can’t have everything. this fo is doing some amazing things, but, as we all know,  the griz have had a really hard time finding shooting guards that can actually shoot. 

i realize his position is somewhat of 2-4. 

think about it- who’s the best sg in Memphis griz hx? eddie jones? bonzi wells?

 

slim. 

Wesley Person! Ok, probably not, but he was the most fun for me. One season he was so ridiculously hot before the all star break that every time he attempted a three the crowd would go crazy. It was so much fun to have a pure shooter. 

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8 hours ago, Ole Dirty Klondike said:

When you really look at it, it's not like he shot anyone or did personal harm. As far as that car vandalism, people leave out the part of the girl throwing a drink his way. That's what started everything. She's a women's bball player who was LeGerald Vick's ex-gf and threw a drink at Vick because he was there with his new gf, not sure if the glass or drink hit Jackson or what. I will say when I was 19 or 20 if someone did that to me, whether male or female, it probably wouldn't have ended well because I would've lost it. Doing something like that is a sign of total disrespect. She scampered to her car and played victim as if she didn't nothing wrong when in actuality she started the whole thing because she was jealous. Sounds like the entire Kansas athletic department needs to learn how to control their emotions and take some anger management training, not just Jackson. 

As far as the music festival, sounds like a case of "do you know who i am" and the bouncer was like "nope". He was probably drunk and/or high and more than likely fled because he didn't want it coming out in the media, very stupid but not harming anyone.

As far as the weed stuff goes, let's be honest, at least 80% of the NBA smokes weed including most of the "good" guys who are clean cut and help the community and whatnot. He just has to have more common sense. Getting a woman pregnant who's twice his age. I'm going to go out on a limb and make an assumption that this isn't this woman's first rodeo with baby momma drama and/or sleeping with athletes. I'll leave it at that.

With that being said, I saw this comment on The Athletic article that i posted and it holds true:

i think that's the question. Has he just been misguided and needs some guidance and is willing to learn or is he reckless, selfish and doesn't care about anyone else but himself. He has to understand that his choices have consequences. 

I 100% agree. He just reminds me of the little dude in the hood who was kinda sheltered. Then all of a sudden has some money and on his own. Mamas boy types.(Hence the older woman). He'll be aite. He can ball...Dam good pickup

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Josh Jackson has talent, that's for sure. This FO is taking a chance on him and if they are lucky the Grizzlies would have gotten one of the more talented young wings in the league.

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58 minutes ago, tjazz22 said:

I 100% agree. He just reminds me of the little dude in the hood who was kinda sheltered. Then all of a sudden has some money and on his own. Mamas boy types.(Hence the older woman). He'll be aite. He can ball...Dam good pickup

Yes.  This exactly.

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As long as he can score us some easy buckets I'm all in at this point

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He is a legit knucklehead and severely lacks maturity.  I just hope a change of environment will help him grow up.   He has the talent and skills to be the 2/3 of the future for us.   It's possible having a real playmaking PG can have a beneficial affect on his shooting efficiency.  I can live with him learning how to grow and develop into a more efficient player as long as he keeps his off the court antics at bay. 

Irony is he was compared to a young Iggy on his comps at Kansa.  http://www.draftexpress.com/profile/Josh-Jackson-117183/

While Tatum and Isaac have fairly high floors - albeit for different reasons - Jackson is much more of a wild card. An edgy, explosive, often emotional prospect with an erratic jumper and a mentality that straddles the border of intensity and instability, Jackson is a bit of an enigma. When he's at his best, Jackson looks like a potential #1 pick, a star in the making. On a fairly small sample, the Michigan native shot 39%, 48% and 40% from beyond the arc in January, February, and March, respectively, knocking down jumpers off the dribble and the catch, despite his somewhat untraditional stroke. When he's shooting it well, Jackson doesn't have many holes. More of a 3/2 than Tatum, who is a 3/4, and Isaac, a four who can play occasional three and five, Jackson is explosive, has positional size, can handle in the open floor, has impressive vision on the move, and is the ultimate competitor defensively and on the glass. -

There's a lot to like about Jackson, who could very will fill an Andre Iguodala type role as a defend-slash-and-pass style prospect on a competitive team. While not quite as wide shouldered or long as Iguodala, they certainly have some similarities in terms of explosiveness, passing ability, grit on the glass and defensive end, and overall versatility, despite not being the most gifted half court scorers. -

Comparing their stats at the same age (Iguodala a sophomore, Jackson a freshman), Jackson was actually a more prolific and efficient scorer, more accurate shooter (small sample), and more productive in terms off ball defensive stat-stuffing, with both playing big roles on very competitive teams. Iguodala, a more gifted passer and ball-handler, appeared to have a more projectable spot-up stroke as well, despite his pedestrian 3-point shooting numbers. Although he's often reluctant from three nowadays, Iguodala is a career 34% 3-point shooter at the NBA level, and if Jackson is able to duplicate that, he could very well follow a similar career path as a high-level role-playing two-way starter who can playmake, attack in a straight line, and make enough spot threes to keep the defense honest. - Source: http://www.draftexpress.com/profile/Josh-Jackson-117183/ ©DraftExpress

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Jackson doesnt seem like the guy to work hard enough off the court but I hope Im wrong.

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He doesnt seem dumb in interviews and stuff maybe he just hangs with folks he shouldnt be yeah sounds lame but sometimes it true lol .

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On 7/5/2019 at 10:20 AM, IdrinkGuinness said:

He doesnt seem dumb in interviews and stuff maybe he just hangs with folks he shouldnt be yeah sounds lame but sometimes it true lol .

He plays the saxophone and started a chess club. I don’t think he’s a bad kid. Just a young dude with a lot of money that needs to chill out 

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On 7/4/2019 at 9:52 PM, The Stro Show said:

I think this is going to be a home run. 

I hope your right 

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1 hour ago, memphis slim said:

well, well. maybe this truly will be his wake up call. it’s going to be interesting to watch for sure. hoping this kid looks in the mirror and grows up because this year is it for him. 

 

slim. 

Diversion is a way to escape responsibility. It gets you a get out of jail for free card so you don't have to face the responsibility for your actions. What's strange is that the diversion exemption is usually only allowed to be used once. This will be Jackson's second use of diversion

I hope he learns this time but history suggests he doesn't believe he has to play by the same rules and this is just another example of him proving that is correct.  

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2 minutes ago, chipc3 said:

Diversion is a way to escape responsibility. It gets you a get out of jail for free card so you don't have to face the responsibility for your actions. What's strange is that the diversion exemption is usually only used once. This will be Jackson's second use of diversion. 

I hope he learns this time but history suggests he doesn't believe he has to play by the same rules and this is just another example of him proving that is correct.  

Excuse my ignorance, but what exactly does a diversion program entail?

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1 minute ago, ACGrizz said:

Excuse my ignorance, but what exactly does a diversion program entail?

You aren't ignorant for not knowing this. 

A diversion program consists of doing community service and/or some form of education program along with a period of probation. It is most commonly offered to first offenders for drug use and some petty crime so that the person (usually a minor) who gets caught smoking a joint, drinking underage or committing a petty crime such as stealing a sandwich from a 7/11. Trying to run away after getting caught sneaking into a VIP area in a concert runs in line with this reasoning. 

The theory behind it is that if the person does the community service and education program the bad action can be turned into a good result without leaving a permanent mark on the individuals record. It is almost NEVER offered twice however because that defeats the purpose. If someone thinks he can dip into the diversion well multiple times there is less of an incentive to correct the behavior that got the person in trouble in the first place. 

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I love the pick up Josh Jackson. the guy can play. will be on his 3rd coach in 3 years like Dillon will be but I think this coach will be his best and get the best out of him. Read yesterday that the coach last year for phoenix wanted to make him a defensive stopper primarily and he's so much more than that. I expect him to start at SG this year. if he pops and lives up to his top 5 draft status, man, this team could be special THIS YEAR.

 

as for his off the court stuff, I think he will be fine. he HAS to learn to control his emotions but they come from a good place. he's competitive and wants to win but he has to harness that. Coach Jenkins is the same way. During some of those summer league time outs when he was addressing the team, you could see the FIRE in his eyes and he wasn't even really mad at them. Coach even talked about how he can get worked up and how his competive fire is. I think he will get the best not just out of Josh but out of all the young guys. We have better vets on the team also that can help lead him. Way more than Phoenix did anyway.

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Yep i figured it was a legal reason why he wasn't here.   It only makes sense for them to give him a good look before deciding on his future. 

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On 7/5/2019 at 10:03 AM, Dwash said:

Jackson doesnt seem like the guy to work hard enough off the court but I hope Im wrong.

All the off the court issues can be justified away, I suppose, but this is my real concern. I just don't think he takes being an NBA player seriously and does not appear to be progressing as a player.

 

I wonder if the Grizzlies make or made a phone call to the Memphis Tigers staff to talk to Cody Toppert, the well respected player development guy that was just with the Suns. I'd be real interested to hear what he knows about Jackson's work ethic.

I expect disappointment, but he's a low risk guy with high upside.

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Then I return to the point, would be great to have some veterans that could take Josh under their wings. If Iggy stayed he would be perfect for that. 

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3 hours ago, chipc3 said:

Diversion is a way to escape responsibility. It gets you a get out of jail for free card so you don't have to face the responsibility for your actions.

I beg to differ.  You make it sound as if diversion is a bad unworthy thing.  In actuality, it is the core principle of the justice system - it allows first time offenders (or offenders who meet certain qualifications) a chance at redemption and to face responsibility; not escape it.  Diversion has been used by thousands of people all throughout this great country - from young to old, rich to poor.  Very successful and important people have benefitted from diversion.   For the most part, these people accept responsibility, make every effort to make amends if required and gain very important insight.  The numbers prove that most don’t re-offend ever again because of the hard work done in these diversion programs.  You are simply mistaken to say diversion is a get out of jail card.  

 

3 hours ago, chipc3 said:

You aren't ignorant for not knowing this. 

A diversion program consists of doing community service and/or some form of education program along with a period of probation. It is most commonly offered to first offenders for drug use and some petty crime so that the person (usually a minor) who gets caught smoking a joint, drinking underage or committing a petty crime such as stealing a sandwich from a 7/11. Trying to run away after getting caught sneaking into a VIP area in a concert runs in line with this reasoning. 

The theory behind it is that if the person does the community service and education program the bad action can be turned into a good result without leaving a permanent mark on the individuals record. It is almost NEVER offered twice however because that defeats the purpose.

Again, you are not giving an accurate picture of what diversion is.  Diversion is offered on a multitude of charges - not just petty crimes.  Almost all criminal charges are eligible.  Many severe felonies - like rape, robbery and murder - can be reduced to lesser felony charges where diversion is allowed.  Most diversions are wasted on petty offenses because of bad inept lawyering or biased harsh officials that churn out this pleas because of the need to fund the system as a whole. 

Additionally, there are different types of diversions - official judicial diversion, unofficial diversion and treatment court diversion to name the three most common.  Official diversion theoretically can only be used once in a jurisdiction - but if you have good lawyering, many times you can piggy back completely new offenses with pending diversions or start new diversions contingent on completing an earlier diversionary program.  Unofficial diversion and treatment court diversion can be used as many times as a person may successfully qualify.  Without knowing more context of Josh Jackson’s negotiated plea into the second diversion - it may be a combination of treatment and unofficial diversion.  

So this notion that someone can’t be offered diversion twice is not completely true.   

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31 minutes ago, huneal said:

I beg to differ.  You make it sound as if diversion is a bad unworthy thing.  In actuality, it is the core principle of the justice system - it allows first time offenders (or offenders who meet certain qualifications) a chance at redemption and to face responsibility; not escape it.  Diversion has been used by thousands of people all throughout this great country - from young to old, rich to poor.  Very successful and important people have benefitted from diversion.   For the most part, these people accept responsibility, make every effort to make amends if required and gain very important insight.  The numbers prove that most don’t re-offend ever again because of the hard work done in these diversion programs.  You are simply mistaken to say diversion is a get out of jail card.  

 

Again, you are not giving an accurate picture of what diversion is.  Diversion is offered on a multitude of charges - not just petty crimes.  Almost all criminal charges are eligible.  Many severe felonies - like rape, robbery and murder - can be reduced to lesser felony charges where diversion is allowed.  Most diversions are wasted on petty offenses because of bad inept lawyering or biased harsh officials that churn out this pleas because of the need to fund the system as a whole. 

Additionally, there are different types of diversions - official judicial diversion, unofficial diversion and treatment court diversion to name the three most common.  Official diversion theoretically can only be used once in a jurisdiction - but if you have good lawyering, many times you can piggy back completely new offenses with pending diversions or start new diversions contingent on completing an earlier diversionary program.  Unofficial diversion and treatment court diversion can be used as many times as a person may successfully qualify.  Without knowing more context of Josh Jackson’s negotiated plea into the second diversion - it may be a combination of treatment and unofficial diversion.  

So this notion that someone can’t be offered diversion twice is not completely true.   

You left out unicorns and rainbows.

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27 minutes ago, huneal said:

I beg to differ.  You make it sound as if diversion is a bad unworthy thing.  In actuality, it is the core principle of the justice system - it allows first time offenders (or offenders who meet certain qualifications) a chance at redemption and to face responsibility; not escape it.  Diversion has been used by thousands of people all throughout this great country - from young to old, rich to poor.  Very successful and important people have benefitted from diversion.   For the most part, these people accept responsibility, make every effort to make amends if required and gain very important insight.  The numbers prove that most don’t re-offend ever again because of the hard work done in these diversion programs.  You are simply mistaken to say diversion is a get out of jail card.  

I didn't mean to imply that important people haven't benefited from diversion. I don't believe I even mentioned someone's importance or lack there of as being a condition of qualifying for it. However it is a get out of jail card that the prosecution can use at their discretion to release someone from jail time in exchange for community service or some education (such as drug rehabilitation). 

Again, you are not giving an accurate picture of what diversion is.  Diversion is offered on a multitude of charges - not just petty crimes.  Almost all criminal charges are eligible.  Many severe felonies - like rape, robbery and murder - can be reduced to lesser felony charges where diversion is allowed.  Most diversions are wasted on petty offenses because of bad inept lawyering or biased harsh officials that churn out this pleas because of the need to fund the system as a whole. 

I am saddened to hear that severe felonies can be expunged from a person's record or reduced in severity by using diversion. 

Additionally, there are different types of diversions - official judicial diversion, unofficial diversion and treatment court diversion to name the three most common.  Official diversion theoretically can only be used once in a jurisdiction - but if you have good lawyering, many times you can piggy back completely new offenses with pending diversions or start new diversions contingent on completing an earlier diversionary program.  Unofficial diversion and treatment court diversion can be used as many times as a person may successfully qualify.  Without knowing more context of Josh Jackson’s negotiated plea into the second diversion - it may be a combination of treatment and unofficial diversion.  

Hence my use of the term get out of jail free card. When people repeatedly break the law they should not be eligible for diversion because they clearly aren't changing their ways after the first exemption. 

So this notion that someone can’t be offered diversion twice is not completely true.   

I didn't say that someone couldn't be offered it more than once. I said it is almost never offered twice. Almost never does leave the rare circumstance where it can be used multiple times. 

 

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Lol why is sad to know records can be cleared and an offender (even a felon) can now lead a life where a mistake doesnt follow him forever? I believe almost anyone can change.

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