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grizzbiz

Rudy needs to go

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See, I didn't say he NEVER goes in the paint. My point was that he should spend more time inside the perimeter than outside the perimeter. That's all I have to say about that.

 

 

It's ridiculous for an athletic, agile, 6'9" forward with a 7'3" wingspan to not be dominating inside the perimeter. There are a lot of points and rebounds Rudy could be getting if he would do more work closer to the goal before getting the ball instead of getting it on the perimeter. I guess that's the coach's problem though.

 

 

I can agree with you here.

 

And I do think Hollins hasn't quite figured out how to use Rudy to the best of his abilities yet. He seems more interested in catching Conley up to speed 1st. I can't say I blame him for that though.

 

However.......

 

Your idea seems to be to move him more to a 4/3 insideout type as opposed to a 3/4 outside-in type of player.

If he's playing there, who's suppose to be spreading the defense out on the perimeter besides OJ and Conley?

What do we do with Arthur and Hak if we move Rudy in? THey can't play out there.

Ross? No.

 

Rudy needs to be out there but, what he needs is a clear out and be able to go one-on-one, or if the double team comes, he needs to be able to find an open man. He has to rely on his teammates for that though.

 

I think that Rudy needs to learn to play by patience as opposed to playing by speed and athleticism. THis, however, will need to be unlearned and relearned because that's an Iavaroni trait.

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He put up 17 and 11 because he took 21 shots and all of our bigs went down for him to grab boards. It had nothing to do with his athleticism.

 

dang u really dont like rudy. So since our bigs went down, the rebounds "automatically" go to rudy or any grizzlies because all is fair in rebounding. He really didnt even have to jump to get em huh?? Just appeared in his hands!

 

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dang u really dont like rudy. So since our bigs went down, the rebounds "automatically" go to rudy or any grizzlies because all is fair in rebounding. He really didnt even have to jump to get em huh?? Just appeared in his hands!

Rudy is a pretty good rebounder. I'm just saying that it helps to not have as many bigs to compete with. Just like in OJ's 16 rebound game. He quadrupled his average. Of course he had to go get them; they didn't magicallly fall into his hands, but you think it didn't help that there was no Chandler or West? Whether they're on the opposing team or the same team, fewer bigs inside usually means that someone else is going to get more boards than usual. Rudy is capable of doing that more often. I'm not trying to take any credit away from him. I'm just saying that his double double wasn't anything worthwhile. Some of you are acting like he pulled down 20 boards or something talking about his athleticism. He didn't have a monster rebounding performance. And to say his athleticism is why he scored 17pts on 7-21 shooting is just laughable to me.

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Plus he's a rookie. Likewise, why can't I be disappointed in Rudy since he's failed to meet my expectations this season? Statistically, you would think that he's had a good year but he has played like crap for most of the year imo.

 

Of course you're welcome to your opinion.

 

Statictically he HAS had a good year WHILE playing like crap. <----That doesn't equal "suck."

 

It might equal inconsistentcy. Blame the coach for that one though.

 

THere was a point where Rudy gave up BUT, I can't blame it was because he realized what Iavytard was doing, wasn't gonna work.......EVER.

 

18.6/5.7/1.7/1.3/.7 <---- Rudy playing like "crap" in his 3rd year this year.

18.1/6.0/5.3/1.6/.4 <---- Andre Iguodala in his 5th year, this year

15.2/7.1/2.4/1.4/1.6 <-- Josh Smith in his 5th year, this year.

22/7.3/3.3.9/.9 <-------- Carmelo Anthony playing in his 6th year, this year.

20.2/6.3/4.5/1.6/.3 <---- Caron Butler this year in his 7th year, this year

20.2/5.7/3.7/1.0/.3 <---- Paul Pierce in his 11th year, this year.

 

These are some of the better SFs in the league and all have at least twice the experience in the league and all are surrounded by better or more experienced players than Rudy and I don't see a whole lot of difference between these guys and Rudy's numbers, except for assists.

 

He needs to work on the assists but, I think that will come when the "team" concept gelvelops.

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I freely admit that I am not a fan of Rudy, but to insist that he needs to go makes me realize that this truely is a Memphis message board. Instead of focusing on the real issues of the team (which are quite varied but do include overall and starting talent) we put the blame on a single person.

 

Again, I don't care much for Rudy and I think decent SF's are plentiful but I have been impressed with his play as of late. I think we should temper the expectations we have of our players, because until this team finds some consistancy (especially in coaching) we cannot expect our players to be consistant. I say that to defend our players that have shown potential, we have others that throughout all this mess have yet to show anything and I believe "heart" would shine through at least occasionally. That needs to be our area of concern not a player that seemingly at worst is an 18ppg guy.

 

Like others on this board, I just get sick of the blame game.

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Guest truebluememphian
I freely admit that I am not a fan of Rudy, but to insist that he needs to go makes me realize that this truely is a Memphis message board. Instead of focusing on the real issues of the team (which are quite varied but do include overall and starting talent) we put the blame on a single person.

 

Again, I don't care much for Rudy and I think decent SF's are plentiful but I have been impressed with his play as of late. I think we should temper the expectations we have of our players, because until this team finds some consistancy (especially in coaching) we cannot expect our players to be consistant. I say that to defend our players that have shown potential, we have others that throughout all this mess have yet to show anything and I believe "heart" would shine through at least occasionally. That needs to be our area of concern not a player that seemingly at worst is an 18ppg guy.

 

Like others on this board, I just get sick of the blame game.

 

 

First of all you are not going to come on this msg board and make a snide comment about my city like that and not get roasted. Note that everyone in Memphis, let alone this msg board, does not act or think in one single way. Should I assume that people from DeSoto (and i'm assuming DeSoto County) can't spell because you misspelled truly?

 

I freely admit that I am not a fan of Rudy, but to insist that he needs to go makes me realize that this truely is a Memphis message board.

 

or consistency? Or consistent?

 

Again, I don't care much for Rudy and I think decent SF's are plentiful but I have been impressed with his play as of late. I think we should temper the expectations we have of our players, because until this team finds some consistancy (especially in coaching) we cannot expect our players to be consistant.

 

The answer to that is no. It's ok to be sick of the blame game. Don't throw my city in the fire, especially if you don't even live in Memphis.

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This whole thing has gotten out of control. It seemed to me like the thread originally wanted to highlight that rudy is a so called "cancer". and not that he is some sort of bench warmer. Rudy is obviously a very talented player that averages good numbers (mostly). The reason for wanting to trade him was not because of his skill, but because of his poor attitude, lack of leadership skills, poor work ethic, and apparent rift with many of his teammates. Id love to work this whole thing out and keep rudy. but like with t.o's case (and still rudy isnt near t.o. in terms of ego) sooner or later, fans have had enough, no matter how good his numbers are

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First of all you are not going to come on this msg board and make a snide comment about my city like that and not get roasted. Note that everyone in Memphis, let alone this msg board, does not act or think in one single way. Should I assume that people from DeSoto (and i'm assuming DeSoto County) can't spell because you misspelled truly?

 

 

 

or consistency? Or consistent?

 

 

 

The answer to that is no. It's ok to be sick of the blame game. Don't throw my city in the fire, especially if you don't even live in Memphis.

 

Plus a million. Don't hate on this great city. This is where I'm from, where my home is and always will be.

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You have to be kidding. But we agree to disagree, I dont even want to argue about it because it still kills me how bad a deal that was and especially seeing how Pau is playing in LA and wondering what we could be if we kept him or got better value back, and was still able to pull off the Mayo deal. Anyone who wants to say we are better off after the Pau deal or that we could not have gotten more for him is kidding themselves. The only way I could see it differently is if keeping Pau would have not open up the oppurtunity to deal for Mayo. We could have and should have gotten more for him. It was a bad trade, period. But im sure others(Pau haters) see it differently. Just my opinion.

 

What are you watching exactly? The trade turned the Lakers into the best team in the West if not the whole league and we are one of the worst if not the worst teams in the league. The nets got an all-star calibre point guard for an aging Jason Kidd and we basically got Marc Gasol and some backups you could find anywhere. I am a huge Grizzlies fan and I cant see how someone couldnt see it as a lop-sided trade. And I understand it was a purely financial move and the best way to start over money wise but there is no doubt in my mind we could have gotten more. Heck we could have traded Pau to Dallas for Devin Harris and I think most people would have been thrilled with that. If Cuban was willing to trade him for an old Jason Kidd im pretty positive he would have traded him for a 27 year old Gasol.

 

I see the opposite:

Why are there still people, Grizzlies fans no less, who didn't see the value of Pau Gasol and recognize what an amazing player he was? I mean...what?? Were you guys paying attention at all? I cannot for the life of me see how a person can hold that point of view, even still.

 

I'm not really in a mood to have this debate for the seven thousandth time. It's not even the topic of the thread. But I'll play along.

 

I see that some Grizzlies fans have chosen to have selective memories about the situation, due to their disappointment over the way this season has gone. Have you forgotten the original goals of the trade for both teams? Have you forgotten the payroll situation for both teams? Have you forgotten the direction both teams were going in? Have you forgotten the records of both teams both before and after the trade went down? Apparently you have.

 

At the time of the trade, the Lakers had the best record in the league. With the addition of Pau, the best, surprise surprise, remained one of the best. Before the trade, we had one of the worst records in the league. After the trade, surprise surprise, we remained one of the worst. But you cannot judge the "winner" of this trade by wins and losses, because while "getting better now" was the goal for the Lakers, it was not the goal of the trade for the Grizzlies. It's not like anybody thought that the teams' positions would flip flop as a result.

 

The goal for the Grizzlies was to take another major step into the youth movement that was already underway, and to get ourselves out from under the contract of Pau, which handcuffed us and essentially locked us into having the roster of a 22 win team for the foreseeable future. When you look at it in that light, both the Grizzlies AND the Lakers accomplished their goals. So, I'm not declaring a winner. I'm declaring both teams winners in the trade. I just don't think the people who say it was "lop-sided" have a leg to stand on, because you're using the wrong standards for judging the outcome.

 

Our record was just as good last year without Pau as it was with him. That is not an indictment against Pau or his game, nor am I a "Pau hater" (no more black and white logic please). His game is wonderful. It just was not built for this team. We were not winning with him as our fifteen million dollar man. We're not winning now either, but we're no worse record wise, only now there is the prospect of getting better and staying that way, now that we have a lot of young talent and are not locked in to being a bad team for years to come due to a lack of available funds to change things. We had the payroll of a playoff team (largely due to the contracts of Pau and Mike), with the win-loss total of a basement dweller. I can't fathom why people wanted to continue down that path.

 

Now, as for whether we could have gotten "more" for him, I say, only in your head could we have gotten more. Do you recall the other proposals on the table? Travis Outlaw and Joel Pryzbilla? Really? Give me another REAL proposal (none of this, probably, maybe so, I'm pretty sure stuff) that you consider to be better than Pau for Marc, $10 million in cap space, and three first round picks. I mean, Marc alone, in his first season in the league is averaging stats that approach Pau's stats on the season. So really, what was it that you guys saw that was better than that?

 

So although nobody should be surprised that we are a bad team this year, we're all disappointed that the season hasn't been better. But don't let that disappointment cause you to ignore reality or revise history. That is all I'll probably say about that. Not only is this not the topic of the thread, but it's also the distant past, impossible to change, and has been more than exhausted.

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See, I didn't say he NEVER goes in the paint. My point was that he should spend more time inside the perimeter than outside the perimeter. That's all I have to say about that.

 

 

It's ridiculous for an athletic, agile, 6'9" forward with a 7'3" wingspan to not be dominating inside the perimeter. There are a lot of points and rebounds Rudy could be getting if he would do more work closer to the goal before getting the ball instead of getting it on the perimeter. I guess that's the coach's problem though.

 

So what does Gasol and Arthur do while Rudy is in the paint?

 

I mean he can be there but he will have to beat 3 defenders to do anything.

 

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Now, as for whether we could have gotten "more" for him, I say, only in your head could we have gotten more. Do you recall the other proposals on the table? Travis Outlaw and Joel Pryzbilla? Really? Give me another REAL proposal (none of this, probably, maybe so, I'm pretty sure stuff) that you consider to be better than Pau for Marc, $10 million in cap space, and three first round picks. I mean, Marc alone, in his first season in the league is averaging stats that approach Pau's stats on the season. So really, what was it that you guys saw that was better than that?

 

 

Oh, I can answer.

 

That's GOLD Jerry!

 

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Not an insider...anything you wouldve rather we done

 

 

Here's a look at 10 teams that missed the boat on Gasol (in alphabetical order):

 

Atlanta Hawks

 

Potential offer:

• Josh Childress (3.6 million expiring contract)

• Tyronn Lue ($3.5 million expiring contract)

• Lorenzen Wright ($3.25 million expiring contract)

• Anthony Johnson ($2.8 million expiring contract)

• First-round draft pick (2010)

• Note: Shelden Williams or perhaps Marvin Williams could have been included in place of Childress

 

Why the deal would have worked for Atlanta: Childress is an important sixth man for the team, but the Hawks are stacked with swingmen and probably don't want to pay Childress a lot as a restricted free agent this summer. The rest of the contracts are dead weight.

 

Gasol would have given the Hawks a much-needed veteran plus flexibility to trade more assets down the road.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The Grizzlies would have received roughly the same amount of cap space.

 

Childress, who has a 17.8 PER (player efficiency rating) this season, is a better player than Crittenton is likely to become, and the Hawks' draft pick (potentially a lottery pick) likely would be worth more than the two picks the Grizzlies received from the Lakers.

 

The downside is that Childress is a restricted free agent this summer, and the Grizzlies might have had to shell out more than the midlevel exception to keep him.

 

Chicago Bulls

 

Potential offer:

• P.J. Brown ($8 million, prorated, expiring sign-and-trade contract)

• Viktor Khryapa ($1.9 million expiring contract)

• Tyrus Thomas ($3.5 million)

• First-round draft pick -- lottery-protected (2008)

 

Why the deal would have worked for Chicago: While giving up Thomas and a draft pick might have hurt the Bulls' effort to rebuild with youth, they would have been giving up little in terms of actual on-court contribution while adding what they desperately need -- a low-post scoring presence.

 

The downside for Chicago would have been that adding Gasol's salary to the books would have pushed them into the luxury tax, something Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf is telling general manager John Paxson he won't pay.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The Grizzlies would have received roughly the same amount of cap space.

 

Thomas has amazing raw tools and would fit a need for the Grizzlies at the 4. He was regarded by many as the top prospect in the 2006 draft, putting him on a much higher plane than Crittenton.

 

Also, the pick from the Bulls likely would have been in the No. 15-19 range, assuming the Bulls would make the playoffs with Gasol aboard, making it an upgrade over the picks the Lakers sent to Memphis.

 

Golden State Warriors

 

Potential offer:

• Mickael Pietrus ($3.4 million expiring contract)

• Matt Barnes ($3 million expiring contract)

• Austin Croshere ($770,610 expiring contract)

• Patrick O'Bryant ($2.2 million expiring contract)

• Brandan Wright ($2.3 million)

• Kelenna Azubuike ($687,000 expiring contract)

• First-round draft pick

 

Why the deal would have worked for Golden State: The Warriors would not have given up any of their core players while adding the perfect low-post complement to Don Nelson's run-and-gun system.

 

O'Bryant is clearly not a Nellie favorite, and Wright is hardly seeing any action either. Given that, getting Gasol would have been quite a coup.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The Grizzlies would have received roughly the same amount of cap space.

 

Wright, a talented 20-year-old big man, was considered one of the best long-term prospects in last year's draft and could fit right into the hole left by Gasol at power forward.

 

Azubuike and Pietrus have talent, and O'Bryant was a top prospect in 2006. The Grizzlies would have had the option of bringing them back or letting them walk (as expiring contracts).

 

One note: Azubuike, Barnes and Pietrus would have had to agree to this trade.

 

Los Angeles Clippers

 

Potential offer:

• Elton Brand ($15.3 million, can opt out after season)

• First-round draft pick (2008)

 

Why the deal would have worked for the Clippers: There's a chance Brand will bolt this summer when he has a chance to opt out of his deal.

 

Adding Gasol would've given the Clippers a solid, younger front line while preserving their flexibility to make other deals. And as a bonus, they would have kept Gasol out of the hands of the Lakers.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: Brand is a useful commodity in any scenario, and his contract could have provided the Grizzlies with several appealing options.

 

If he had decided to return next season, he would have upgraded the team, since he's a better player than Gasol and a better fit on the Grizzlies' front line.

 

If he had wanted to become a free agent, the Grizzlies could have let him walk (and cleared cap space) or worked out a sign-and-trade with him and another team.

 

Or he and the Grizzlies could have agreed on a long-term deal to keep him in Memphis.

 

Also, the Clippers' 2008 first-round pick almost certainly will be a lottery pick of more value than the two picks the Lakers gave the Grizzlies.

 

Miami Heat

 

Potential offer:

• Jason Williams ($8.9 million expiring contract)

• Alonzo Mourning ($2.7 million expiring contract)

• Daequan Cook ($1.1 million)

• Alexander Johnson ($770,610)

• Two first-round draft picks

 

Why the deal would have worked for Miami: If the Heat are going to make one last push for the playoffs with Shaquille O'Neal (who has two more years on his contract after this season, at $20 million per year), they need more help for Dwyane Wade.

 

Getting Gasol would have given them another scorer and some depth in the frontcourt.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: This trade would have probably been a wash with the Lakers deal.

 

The Grizzlies would have cleared a similar amount of cap room, and Cook is on par with Crittenton as a prospect.

 

The two future first-round draft picks might have turned out to be more valuable than the Lakers' picks, especially in the long run. But Miami already owes a pick to Minnesota, so it would have been awhile before the Grizzlies actually received the picks, which might have been a problem.

 

One solution that might have made a trade with Miami work for Memphis would have been to include Brian Cardinal, whom the Grizzlies have been trying to move for years. The Heat could have sent back Smush Parker and Dorell Wright's expiring contract.

 

New Jersey Nets

 

Potential offer:

• Jamaal Magloire ($4 million expiring contract)

• Bostjan Nachbar ($2.5 million expiring contract)

• Antoine Wright ($1.6 million expiring contract)

• Nenad Krstic ($1.9 million expiring contract)

• Darrell Armstrong ($770,610 expiring contract)

• Malik Allen ($770,610 expiring contract)

• Two first-round draft picks

 

Why the deal would have worked for New Jersey: The Nets might prefer to move Jason Kidd and/or Vince Carter and start rebuilding. But both players are proving difficult to move.

 

The other direction to go would be to add a low-post scoring presence. Gasol would have been a great fit. The Nets' payroll would have been totally wrapped up in four guys (Kidd, Carter, Gasol, Richard Jefferson), but the team would have become strong again.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The deal would have cleared about the same amount of cap room.

 

Krstic should be a very nice player again once he recovers from knee surgery. He will be a restricted free agent this summer, but the Grizzlies could have locked him up fairly inexpensively.

 

And the two first-round picks should be better than those the Lakers gave up.

 

Orlando Magic

 

Potential offer:

• Keyon Dooling ($3.6 million expiring contract)

• Pat Garrity ($3.8 million expiring contract)

• Maurice Evans ($1.7 million expiring contract)

• J.J. Redick ($2 million)

• Draft rights to Fran Vazquez

• Two first-round draft picks

 

Why the deal would have worked for Orlando: The Magic are an up-and-coming team, but they lack depth on the front line. Rashard Lewis is playing out of position at the 4. Put Gasol at power forward and move Lewis back to the 3 -- with Turkoglu providing All-Star level support at both positions -- and the Magic would have had perhaps the best front line in the NBA, considering Dwight Howard's presence at center.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The Grizzlies would have received roughly the same amount of cap space.

 

Redick is a former lottery pick who can really shoot -- perhaps he's not a better prospect than Crittenton, but he's probably on the same tier. Vazquez is a better international prospect than Marc Gasol.

 

And those two first-round picks are likely to be better than the picks Memphis got from the Lakers.

 

Phoenix Suns

 

Potential offer:

• Shawn Marion ($16.4 million, can opt out after season)

• Atlanta's 2008 first-round draft pick

 

Why the deal would have worked for Phoenix: The Suns are looking for size and have been shopping Marion for two years. Meanwhile, he asked to be traded during training camp and might opt out of his contract, leaving Phoenix empty-handed.

 

The Suns actually would have saved some money in the short term and wouldn't have had to worry anymore about Marion's moods or negotiating position. While Gasol wouldn't have given them the toughness they need, he would have been a great fit in coach Mike D'Antoni's system.

 

As for the draft pick, the Suns don't seem to value those, usually selling them or trading them away.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The Grizzlies would have cleared a great amount of cap room if Marion opted out of his contract, which would have been expected, given the choice of staying in Memphis or leaving for a long-term contract elsewhere. Also, that could have led to a sign-and-trade opportunity for Memphis to land a player it might have wanted this summer.

 

If Marion had decided not to opt out, his contract would still be expiring in 2009.

 

Atlanta's draft pick likely will be a late-lottery or mid-first-round pick, which is probably more valuable than the pair of picks the Lakers gave up.

 

San Antonio Spurs

 

Potential offer:

• Brent Barry ($5.5 million expiring contract)

• Francisco Elson ($3 million expiring contract )

• Robert Horry ($3.6 million expiring contract)

• Ian Mahinmi ($625,000)

• Two first-round draft picks (2008 and 2010)

 

Why the deal would have worked for San Antonio: Adding Gasol would've injected new life into the franchise. With Gasol and Tim Duncan manning the frontline and Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili in the backcourt, the Spurs would've been back on top of the West. The downside would be the serious luxury tax ramifications of adding Gasol. But he'd probably be worth it.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: This is virtually an identical deal to what the Lakers offered Memphis. The Grizzlies would have received roughly the same amount of cap space.

 

Mahinmi is a prospect, albeit a very raw one, who can play the 4.

 

The two first-round picks, like the Lakers, would've likely been very late first-round picks.

 

Toronto Raptors

 

Potential offer:

• Andrea Bargnani ($4.8 million)

• Carlos Delfino ($1.8 million expiring contract)

• Juan Dixon ($2.5 million expiring contract)

• Joey Graham ($1.6 million)

• Jamario Moon ($770,610)

 

Why the deal would have worked for Toronto: The franchise is high on Bargnani and Moon, but Gasol alongside Chris Bosh would have given the Raptors one of the best front lines in basketball. Given the strength throughout the roster, the Raptors would have been real competitors to the Celtics and the Pistons.

 

Why the deal would have worked for Memphis: The Grizzlies would not have cleared a lot of cap room, but they would have received some very interesting young players, especially Bargnani (the No. 1 pick in the 2006 draft) and Moon, an older rookie who is likely to be a first team All-Rookie selection this year.

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Grizzlies were just stupid for trading Pau. 'Nough Said.

 

 

Why? That is just silly. Would they be stupid if they traded him to New York and New York wasn't a contender?

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Oh, I can answer.

 

That's GOLD Jerry!

 

I dunno man, I suppose player to player preferences are a matter of opinion, but although I love the potential of Tyrus Thomas and Brendan Wright, and think that Childress and Pietrus would be perfect sixth men, there isn't anyone on that list I'd rather have than Marc Gasol. That is, of course, assuming that Brand and Marion would have just opted out.

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Guest truebluememphian
So what does Gasol and Arthur do while Rudy is in the paint?

 

I mean he can be there but he will have to beat 3 defenders to do anything.

 

I would like to see Rudy either back people down or face em' up inside the 3 point line. The way Bosh does it, D-Williams, B-Diddy, King James, Melo, and many others do. Gasol and Arthur either get ready to box out, transition, or get somewhere else on the court.

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I dunno man, I suppose player to player preferences are a matter of opinion, but although I love the potential of Tyrus Thomas and Brendan Wright, and think that Childress and Pietrus would be perfect sixth men, there isn't anyone on that list I'd rather have than Marc Gasol. That is, of course, assuming that Brand and Marion would have just opted out.

 

 

I expected about what we got for Gasol and would not undo the trade for nothing. People forget that Pau did not want to be here anymore. That is the only reason he got traded.

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At the time of the trade, the Lakers had the best record in the league. With the addition of Pau, the best, surprise surprise, remained one of the best.

 

I don't want to extend this debate. There are so many people with different opinions, and I don't think anybody is going to change his mind at this point.

 

But a fact is a fact, and when Pau was traded, Lakers were and 4-4 without Bynum (35-20 season, not the best record in the league at all). After the trade, they went 22-5 (all of them without Andrew), and as everybody knows, they reached the finals.

 

So Pau was a huge improvement for LA. I would say he was after Kobe the main piece on a championship contender. And so he is this year, with and without Bynum.

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I don't want to extend this debate. There are so many people with different opinions, and I don't think anybody is going to change his mind at this point.

 

But a fact is a fact, and when Pau was traded, Lakers were and 4-4 without Bynum (35-20 season, not the best record in the league at all). After the trade, they went 22-5 (all of them without Andrew), and as everybody knows, they reached the finals.

 

So Pau was a huge improvement for LA. I would say he was after Kobe the main piece on a championship contender. And so he is this year, with and without Bynum.

 

You're right, I was thinking of the Shawn Marion for Shaq trade. I think the Suns had the best record in the West at the time of that trade. In any case, I believe all of my points still stand.

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Will there be some disappointed people when Rudy gets an extension?

 

 

Depends on what the extension looks like. 5/$60 million is reasonable.

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