JWill4L

Draft And Free Agency '17

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chipc3    0
50 minutes ago, GF#1 said:

I can't speak for everyone, but I always have reasoning for not liking a player. Not liking a player just for the sake of it and providing nothing to back it up is senseless, IMHO.

I didn't like Tony Allen for the past couple of seasons because his defense no longer made up for his glaring deficiencies offensively, and it was time to move on. Not to mention that the team has changed quite a bit, with Zbo getting older and no longer capable of being a true #1. There were a few seasons in a row where the Grizzlies were right in the thick of it in the Western Conference, and much of that had to do with Tony, but that ship has sailed.

There are reasons that we can blame Tony, and Joerger, and Z-Bo, and Gasol and Parsons, etc etc etc. 

Everyone can find their scapegoat of choice. 

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57 minutes ago, GF#1 said:

Of course, but it's always because of my personal evaluation of the player. A combination of how he conducts himself on and off the court, and my thoughts on what his game has to offer. Strengths v.s. weaknesses, and what type of potential he has. Some of that evaluation has a bit of gut instinct, but it's because of my specific thoughts on the individual player. Sometimes you're right, and sometimes you're wrong.

If you're using criteria like you suggest (effort, lack of fit), that's perfectly understandable. I was simply stating that I feel like it's senseless for someone not to like a player, and cites nothing that has anything to do with his game and what he brings to the team.

I should have said people sometimes don't like people for a valid reason or a good reason. Everyone has biases and preconceived notions of people, whether they are right or wrong. Many people find 1 thing about a player(or person in general) that just irritates them and they focus on it while the majority of people don't even notice it.

i do know people who don't like people for no good reason or no reason at all. They just don't like that person.

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24 minutes ago, chipc3 said:

There are reasons that we can blame Tony, and Joerger, and Z-Bo, and Gasol and Parsons, etc etc etc. 

Everyone can find their scapegoat of choice. 

Very valid and true.

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Ndq0327    0

I sent this to Hollinger on the 7th which was around the same time frame Rabb got hurt it was a sign from the basketball gods passed by me and he didn't listen.

 

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SC Grizz    0
3 hours ago, Grizzled Vet said:

Remaining Centers and PFs of note (UFA), all in that 27-30 age range (except Pau, who is very likely returning to SA):

Mo Speights

Pau

JaVale McGee

Dante Cunningham

Willie Reed

Roy Hibbert

Tyler Zeller

Thomas Robinson

 

Note: Mason Plumlee, Alex Len, Nikola Mirotic and Nerlens Noel are RFA

Reed signed w/ LAC

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15 hours ago, Ndq0327 said:

Harrison doesn't have a low bball IQ I'm still confused why he is so hated. I think it's because he took Ta's minutes last year and some people are still butt hurt by it.

Harrison wasn't anything special but he wasn't a trainwreck either he rarely makes a bad play he works hard on defense and he improved as the season went on. Harrison is a consistent jump shot away from being a good player and he seems like the type that will work to achieve that

If you don't think he has a low BBIQ, watch him when he plays with the other young guys. Completely selfish and out of control. He played a lot minutes with the vets, so they masked it, and even then, he looked clueless coming off a PnR.

I can't believe Andrew Freaking Harrison has supporters on here.

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chipc3    0
21 hours ago, Ndq0327 said:

I sent this to Hollinger on the 7th which was around the same time frame Rabb got hurt it was a sign from the basketball gods passed by me and he didn't listen.

In the interest of fairness. Perhaps we should show this video as well. 

 

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Derrick Rose may be had for $2.1 mil. Say what you want but he avg 18 ppg last year and could help this team more than most Gs on our current roster, especially for $2.1 mil

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Thomas    0
11 minutes ago, Notorious O.D.K. said:

Derrick Rose may be had for $2.1 mil. Say what you want but he avg 18 ppg last year and could help this team more than most Gs on our current roster, especially for $2.1 mil

Anyone know how much of the MLE we have left?

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12 minutes ago, Notorious O.D.K. said:

Derrick Rose may be had for $2.1 mil. Say what you want but he avg 18 ppg last year and could help this team more than most Gs on our current roster, especially for $2.1 mil

Rather have Tyreke - he is the more versatile player and better shooter. 

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chipc3    0
On 7/19/2017 at 9:32 AM, Ndq0327 said:

Harrison doesn't have a low bball IQ I'm still confused why he is so hated. I think it's because he took Ta's minutes last year and some people are still butt hurt by it.

Harrison wasn't anything special but he wasn't a trainwreck either he rarely makes a bad play he works hard on defense and he improved as the season went on. Harrison is a consistent jump shot away from being a good player and he seems like the type that will work to achieve that

I don't know how we as fans can determine a low or high IQ really after a rookie season. His IQ will certainly rise this year as he has gained playoff and regular season experience. He never turned the ball over that much, didn't create that much either. He didn't blow too many defensive assignments, didn't make that many outstanding defensive stops either (outside of that one game in the playoffs when he made two sensational plays). He shot terribly all season, but most rookies shoot terribly their first year in the league. 

The bottom line is he was a rookie, 2nd rd draft pick PG and he played as you'd expect a rookie, 2nd round draft pick PG to play, not dramatically worse or better. If he improves his shot and starts feeling the spots where he can make moves more efficiently people won't be displeased with him as a backup. Most rookie PG are either lottery picks who come to bad teams and freelance their way around their mistakes or they sit on the bench and learn. Harrison spent a year in the D-League, a year learning in the NBA and now faces probably the most important season of his career. 

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11 minutes ago, Thomas said:

Anyone know how much of the MLE we have left?

Not much, I think we are hard capped right now. We used the MLE on McLemore, Chalmers and maybe Rade(?), not sure. I think we used the BAE on Tyreke 

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17 minutes ago, chipc3 said:

I don't know how we as fans can determine a low or high IQ really after a rookie season. His IQ will certainly rise this year as he has gained playoff and regular season experience. He never turned the ball over that much, didn't create that much either. He didn't blow too many defensive assignments, didn't make that many outstanding defensive stops either (outside of that one game in the playoffs when he made two sensational plays). He shot terribly all season, but most rookies shoot terribly their first year in the league. 

The bottom line is he was a rookie, 2nd rd draft pick PG and he played as you'd expect a rookie, 2nd round draft pick PG to play, not dramatically worse or better. If he improves his shot and starts feeling the spots where he can make moves more efficiently people won't be displeased with him as a backup. Most rookie PG are either lottery picks who come to bad teams and freelance their way around their mistakes or they sit on the bench and learn. Harrison spent a year in the D-League, a year learning in the NBA and now faces probably the most important season of his career. 

Didn't you determine that Rade had a high BBIQ after a couple of SL games? I agree with your overall thoughts but just saying....

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chipc3    0
15 minutes ago, Notorious O.D.K. said:

Didn't you determine that Rade had a high BBIQ after a couple of SL games?

People make comments like that all the time but what does it mean? Did he take a test and we can compare scores? 

He has a high (or low) BBIQ isn't easy to define much less quantify. For me it means making the proper defensive rotations in a timely manner, not taking contested shots, making clean passes. Is that everyone's definition? Is it anyone else's definition? In my definition I feel Rade had a high BBIQ but low athleticism. I can't say Rade's BBIQ is higher or lower than other players in comparison, especially in summer league game. 

I can say with some certainty that Dillon Brooks has a 6'6" wingspan and that is short compared to most of the current 3 and D type guards around the league. I can say Davis is 6'11" and has a 7' 2.5" wingspan which is more than comparable to most big men in the league today. I can say Daniels has an excellent 3 point shot and range by factoring his shots made and their location These are definable talents which can be measured. 

BBIQ is as much about people's preconceived perceptions as it is something tangible. Some would surmise that since Davis has a funny haircut and big eyes so he has to have a low BBIQ. Others would say Davis played for Tom Izzo at Michigan State so he likely learned a lot from him so his BBIQ must be high. Others will say they listened to a number of summer league podcasts and that somehow they can discern from these opinions what a player's BBIQ is. 

Are they right? Can we determine BBIQ by eyesight alone? Maybe the club has tested the players and they can make definitive comments about their BBIQ? That would be helpful. Until then I may quote Fizdale or Wallace saying they have a high BBIQ but otherwise that is a rather vacuous statement meant to confirm and coerce a preconceived idea without any truth behind it. 

And that goes for any comment I may have made about Rade's BBIQ too! ;)

 

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fanboyslim    0
21 minutes ago, Notorious O.D.K. said:

Not much, I think we are hard capped right now. We used the MLE on McLemore, Chalmers and maybe Rade(?), not sure. I think we used the BAE on Tyreke 

Chalmers most likely was signed with the minimum salary exception, since his minimum salary is pretty much the same as our remaining MLE money.

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6 hours ago, chipc3 said:

People make comments like that all the time but what does it mean? Did he take a test and we can compare scores? 

He has a high (or low) BBIQ isn't easy to define much less quantify. For me it means making the proper defensive rotations in a timely manner, not taking contested shots, making clean passes. Is that everyone's definition? Is it anyone else's definition? 

I can say with some certainty that Dillon Brooks has a 6'6" wingspan and that is short compared to most of the current 3 and D type guards around the league. I can say Davis is 6'11" and has a 7' 2.5" wingspan which is more than comparable to most big men in the league today. I can say Daniels has an excellent 3 point shot and range by factoring his shots made and their location These are definable talents which can be measured. 

BBIQ is as much about people's preconceived perceptions as it is something tangible. Some would surmise that since Davis has a funny haircut and big eyes so he has to have a low BBIQ. Others would say Davis played for Tom Izzo at Michigan State so he likely learned a lot from him so his BBIQ must be high. Are either right? Can we determine BBIQ by eyesight alone? Maybe the club has tested the players and they can make definitive comments about their BBIQ? 

 

Once again, I totally agree with everything you said, I just thought it was funny that after a couple of SL games, you said that Rade had a good BBIQ 😀 No biggie.

Clearly it's a qualitative measure. The thing is, more and more, when I hear someone say that someone has a good BBIQ, it's meaningless to me. What's more meaningful is if they have a low BBIQ. That's troubling. To me, BBIQ means you know the plays, know where to be in those plays and on the defensive side you understand where you should be or what you should do to stop the other team. That should be the baseline for all NBA players, it's not but it should be. On the flip side, having a low BBIQ to me means that you are disruptive to your teams chances of winning- you're constantly out if place on off and def, you don't run the play properly, you ignore the plays and try to force stuff, you repeatedly make bonehead places, never in position, not picking up on situations. You're just hurting your team. 

To me, it's kind of like SL. I can't tell much if someone does well because you should do well in SL, but I can tell a lit if you don't do well. 

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Chip and ODK Those are actually two pretty good summaries of BBIQ and how i view it as well.

I found this link from a College BBall coach that attempts to define it as well. 

https://kevinsuttonbasketball.wordpress.com/2011/04/25/basketball-iq-the-new-talentskill/

Basketball IQ the NEW Talent/Skill!
 
  • Have you watched a basketball game lately and the game just left you wondering what happend?  Or why did that player take that shot? Or why didn’t the team call timeout? or Why did they foul?
  • Have you ever wondered why so many time outs are called late in the game to diagram a play?  Why doesn’t the team have a play for that situation?
  • Why do games just end with no strategy employed?
For that very reason, I have come to realize that the new talent/skill in the game of basketball is BASKETBALL IQ!  I define talent/skill as the ability to do something easily and quickly that sets you apart from others and makes you unique.
 
Examples of talent/skill in the game of basketball are:
  • Dribbling skills – Chris Paul
  • Passing skills – Jason Kidd
  • Court vision skills – Steve Nash
  • Shooting skills – Ray Allen
  • Scoring skills – Kobe Bryant
  • Rebounding skills – Kevin Love
  • Defensive skills – Dwight Howard
I feel that basketball IQ is:
  1. having the ability to process information at game speed
  2. reading the flow of the game and determine if it needs to be changed
  3. the understanding of the importance of time and score
  4. the understanding of shot selection
  5. the understanding of his teammates strength’s and weaknesses
  6. knowing and developing an understanding of the scouting report/game plan
  7. developing a relationship with the coaching staff so to better understand the system
  8. knowing your opponents
  9. watching tapes of your team, of yourself, of the opposing team and the person you will defend
  10. listening to knowledgeable people, reading about the game, studying the game.
  11. having the ability to understand what was drawn/discussed in the timeout, execute it on the floor and being able to make the proper “basketball reads” if the play isn’t there. This is especially important in late game situations.
I really believe that college coaches need to place an emphasis on recruiting BASKETBALL IQ just as much as they recruit the other 7 skills that I have listed above. The teams/programs that find those players that have high basketball IQs are going to be the teams/programs that will consistently win the close games.  When games are close a players basketball IQ thus becomes the real talent!

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Grizz&Grind    0

Good stuff.

I think observable basketball IQ is pretty easy to see in a game.

Players who struggle to make post entry passes, who struggle making proper bounce passes, who don't know how to post up, who don't use fakes - ball fakes, pump fakes, shot fakes, etc., who get lost on backdoor cuts, not sealing your man when your guard drives to the basket (if you're an inside player) OR not moving to an open space for the pass when your man picks up the driving guard...etc.

You could run through several of these things...basketball IQ just really equates to who taught these players the game of basketball...when you dig down through AAU and high school, a lot of guys are just run through daily drills and aren't really taught the "feel" stuff.

Regardless of what you think of Coach K, go watch some tapes of him instructing during his practices - he doesn't just tell them to run a zone defense, he tells them the why and the how.

On the other hand, some players are not coach-able either - Lance Stephenson comes to mind as a guy who is just going to do it his way a percentage of the time.

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Father Pat    0
47 minutes ago, Wells said:

Good article by David Aldridge at NBA.com about the salary cap situation and how it is effecting this year's free agent class..

http://www.nba.com/article/2017/07/24/morning-tip-unintended-consequences-cba-free-agency-2017

Very good find Wells, thanks for sharing.

Nothing gets the league taking action like loss of revenue. There will be changes coming to prevent "super teams" in the future.

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TimBC    0
On 7/20/2017 at 11:36 AM, chipc3 said:

Can we determine BBIQ by eyesight alone?  

It might be that it is almost the same thing as "perceived game speed" - anyone who's moved up a level in any sport knows what I mean.
When you move up, everything happens too quickly. When you settle in, it slows down. If you're an elite player, everyone ELSE seems to be rushing but you are cool and have what feels like all the time in the world to make that decision. So you make the right decision a little more often than the other guys, and they say you have a high BBIQ.    

This may be the hurdle Baldwin has to clear. 

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17 hours ago, Wells said:

Good article by David Aldridge at NBA.com about the salary cap situation and how it is effecting this year's free agent class..

http://www.nba.com/article/2017/07/24/morning-tip-unintended-consequences-cba-free-agency-2017

I found this paragraph really interesting

The 2017 playoffs produced what almost everyone predicted before the season, and what many fans wanted: a Warriors-Cavaliers Finals for a third straight season. But the playoffs weren’t what the league and union needed to make more money: long. This year’s postseason produced only 79 out of a potential 105 games, with eight of the 15 playoff series going five games or less, and only two series going a full seven games.

The resulting drop in revenues from all those series ending early further lowered the 2017-18 cap. Instead of $102 million, the cap for ’17-’18 was reduced to $99 million. That shortfall of $8 million from what was originally anticipated has squeezed a lot of this summer’s free agents.

“The sweeps killed us,” said an official involved in negotiations between the league and the union

 

I wonder if this upcoming season the refs will go out of there way to make sure to "extend" series.    Unfortunately, this can mean that the arms race in the west is a good thing.   Having more superstars to battle the GSW in the west should translate to more losses for the elite teams, which extends playoff series and generates more revenue.     Watered down East has the same affect as well.  Because they have less stars the playoffs should be more competitive by default.      This doesn't bode well for memphis chances of advancement but it should improve the overall product in the West.  

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Dwash    0
10 minutes ago, GrizzTigerFan said:

I found this paragraph really interesting

The 2017 playoffs produced what almost everyone predicted before the season, and what many fans wanted: a Warriors-Cavaliers Finals for a third straight season. But the playoffs weren’t what the league and union needed to make more money: long. This year’s postseason produced only 79 out of a potential 105 games, with eight of the 15 playoff series going five games or less, and only two series going a full seven games.

The resulting drop in revenues from all those series ending early further lowered the 2017-18 cap. Instead of $102 million, the cap for ’17-’18 was reduced to $99 million. That shortfall of $8 million from what was originally anticipated has squeezed a lot of this summer’s free agents.

“The sweeps killed us,” said an official involved in negotiations between the league and the union

 

I wonder if this upcoming season the refs will go out of there way to make sure to "extend" series.    Unfortunately, this can mean that the arms race in the west is a good thing.   Having more superstars to battle the GSW in the west should translate to more losses for the elite teams, which extends playoff series and generates more revenue.     Watered down East has the same affect as well.  Because they have less stars the playoffs should be more competitive by default.      This doesn't bode well for memphis chances of advancement but it should improve the overall product in the West.  

Maybe but I dont know how many games even the refs can squeeze out of a Golden State series without compromising all integrity.

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